Lowe’s Heroes help Martha’s Home

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A BIG ‘Thank You’ to the miracle workers from Lowe’s Heroes! These hard-working volunteers pulled together to help fix, upgrade and remodel Martha’s Home.

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Newly Remodeled Kitchen

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Newly Remodeled Kitchen

Kitchen Renovation – New Maple Cabinetry, Appliance and Storage

Posted by shannondemma on 2011-08-29 22:38:26

Tagged: , Beach Bungalow Renovation , Kitchen , Lanzl-Hoagland , Remodel … Read More

Why You Shouldn’t DIY – Basement Underpinning

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From the time when prehistoric man first started using stone tools in his daily life doing it yourself was a way of life. Over the centuries, as building techniques developed to become more complex and simple tools have evolved into sophisticated machines, the job of the amateur handyman has become quite difficult. Usually in an effort to cut costs on a home improvement project, the modern do-it-yourself-er has his/her hands full with building codes, user manuals, and building instructions. Having said that, most home improvement projects are not only doable, but can arguably be done better if you are diligent enough and prepared to work. Other projects, however, are much too complicated for the average construction enthusiast and should be left solely to the professionals. Basement underpinning is such a project.

What is it that sets basement underpinning apart from other home improvement projects you ask? To answer that question in a nutshell, pretty much everything. There is no single thing about lowering your basement that is overwhelming. Taken separately, all aspects of the job are manageable and can be handled. However, collectively the process of lowering a basement to get some extra head space can become quite a headache.

Before you can even get started with any manual labor you will need to get a building permit. The nature of the project is such that if done incorrectly you can end up losing your home altogether. This is because when a home is built it is engineered to withstand the forces of nature that act upon it. Beyond your basement walls is not just soil, its pressure. If you go into this project without knowing where to dig, how to dig and how much to dig, soon enough your foundation walls will slide out from beneath your main floor, and your kitchen will be in your basement. To make sure that your basement can even be lowered, you will need to hire an engineer. You can always shop around and find a good deal, or maybe you have a friend who can do the plans for you, however most often than not a basement underpinning contractor will be able to provide engineering services to you at a discounted price.

Once you have your building permit you can get started. Oh wait, you don’t have any of the necessary equipment. Consider this, to dismantle your current concrete floor you will need the following: a conveyor belt system, a waste bin or two or three, a power generator, and jack hammer to connect to it. Although not impossible to obtain, the rental rates for you will be far higher than for a contractor, and chances are the contractor you choose for basement underpinning will already have these tools in their inventory.

Getting the right tools, is very much an issue of patience and organization. Once you have them, however, everything becomes a lot more serious. The tools that you will be working with when lowering your basement are power tools – … Read More

Marianne’s Finished Kitchen Renovation – HGTV Handmade

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Marianne’s kitchen renovation is finally finished! See how she personalized her space with vintage modern details and color accents. Follow us on Twitter for …

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looking N at entrance to dining room – Tinsley Living Farm – Museum of the Rockies – 2013-07-08

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looking N at entrance to dining room - Tinsley Living Farm - Museum of the Rockies - 2013-07-08

Looking north at the entrance to the dining room on the first floor of the house on the grounds of the Tinsley Living Farm at the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Montana. Few houses had a dining room, unless they had large families. Note the chairs, as people would need to sit close to the stove in winter.

The house was constructed in 1889 by William and Lucy (Nave) Tinsley. William Tinsley worked for Wells Fargo and migrated to Montana in 1864. Lucy was a dressmaker who emigrated to Virginia City, Montana, the same year. Both were originally from Missouri. They met in Virginia City, married in 1867, and relocated to Willow Creek in the Gallatin Valley (about 40 miles west of Bozeman). They built a homestead log cabin (about the size of the current blacksmith shop), and lived there until 1889. Their first child was born in 1868, and by 1889 they had eight kids.

William Tinsley built the family a two-story home out of logs taken from the nearby Tobacco Root Mountains. The oldest children helped haul the logs, which took two days to get to the homestead. The structure took two years to construct. Most of the items in the house were ordered from the Sears catalog. The family occupied the house until the 1920s.

The house was purchased by the museum in 1987, and moved from its original location to the Museum of the Rockies in 1989. Refurbished with items donated by Tinsley descendants, it now serves as a living history museum. The house sits on 10 acres of land, and includes a historically accurate kitchen garden, flower garden, chicken coop, farm implements, carriage house, blacksmith shop, root cellar, outhouse, functioning well and pump, storage shed, and fields. A full cellar was excavated beneath Tinsley House as well.

Visitors are free to touch and use many of the items in Tinsley House. A staff of historical re-enactors includes four women who cook, clean, sew, and perform chores around the house as well as a blacksmith who does ironmongery and repairs.

Posted by Tim Evanson on 2013-07-23 02:17:04

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