Residential for sale – 425 LOWE ST, Wenatchee, WA 98801

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Listing Site: Property Site: Beautiful updated rambler. New HVAC. Lots of mature landscaping for beauty and privacy. Large family room with fireplace…

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House Renovation 030

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House Renovation 030

Posted by [email protected] on 2007-10-24 05:18:47

Tagged: , Home , Renovation … Read More

DIY Kitchen Renovation – Demo Day! | DIY Distress

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My husband and I are renovating our kitchen. Our house was built in the 1920’s and the kitchen was in dire need of a remodel. We are always up for learning, …

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Farmland in Upstate New York

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Farmland in Upstate New York

Centuries ago, European farmers would seal the wood on their barns with an oil, often linseed oil — a tawny-colored oil derived from the seed of the flax plant. They would paint their barns with a linseed-oil mixture, often consisting of additions such as milk and lime. The combination produced a long-lasting paint that dried and hardened quickly. (Today, linseed oil is sold in most home-improvement stores as a wood sealant). Now, where does the red come from?

In historically accurate terms, "barn red" is not the bright, fire-engine red that we often see today, but more of a burnt-orange red. As to how the oil mixture became traditionally red, there are two predominant theories:
•Wealthy farmers added blood from a recent slaughter to the oil mixture. As the paint dried, it turned from a bright red to a darker, burnt red.
•Farmers added ferrous oxide, otherwise known as rust, to the oil mixture. Rust was plentiful on farms and is a poison to many fungi, including mold and moss, which were known to grown on barns. These fungi would trap moisture in the wood, increasing decay.

Regardless of how the farmer tinted his paint, having a red barn became a fashionable thing. They were a sharp contrast to the traditional white farmhouse.

Posted by SevenOneSeven MamboDan on 2012-10-23 02:42:12

Tagged: , barn , red , red barn , farmland , nys , New York State , country , farm , HDR … Read More

Ceiling Fan Pros and Cons

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Guess what? The title of this article is just out-and-out misleading. The only real “con” when it comes to a ceiling fan is what it takes to get one properly installed. Ceiling fans can be difficult to install for the inexperienced do-it-yourselfer. In some cases, you will need to run an electrical line to the area where the ceiling fan is to be installed. Unless you are adept at doing this sort of thing, hiring a licensed, bonded and qualified electrician will more than likely save you much grief in the long run.

There is also the minor “con” that involves the issue of periodic maintenance. Properly installed, a ceiling fan will provide years and years of pleasant cooling and cost-savings on your heating bill (assuming you have a fan that allows you to reverse the blade direction). Granted, you need to wipe down the blades once in a while but then, everyone has household cleaning chores to take care of from time to time.

On occasion, ceiling fans get out of balance and need minor adjustments. The most common culprits are loose screws that attach the blades to the motor housing, blades that are not at the same angle (pitch) as the rest of the blades and a blade or blades that weigh slightly more than the others.

Without going into great detail, make sure that all the screws are tight. If they aren’t tighten the ones that have come loose and run the fan. If the wobbling has stopped, your problem has been solved.

If not, use a yardstick or other straight piece of wood and place it (with the fan stopped) vertically at the outer edge of one of the blades. Rotate the blades by hand to make sure that each blade touches the stick. If one or more don’t, simply (and gently) bend the blade(s) so that their pitch matches the others and repeat the process until you are satisfied that each blade has the same pitch. Turn the fan on again and see if you’ve solved the problem.

If not, you’ve got a weight problem (I don’t necessarily mean you, personally). The weight problem is with one or more of the blades weighing slightly more than the others. This sometimes happens when the blades are made of natural, organic material such as wood. Manufacturers often include what are called “balancing weights” in the box with the ceiling fan. These can be used to compensate for any differentials in weight that may have resulted over time. These “balancing weights”, or clips as they are sometime called, can be attached to the top of the blade so that they are virtually out of sight. Start with one blade by attaching the clip close to where the blade is attached to the motor. Run the fan. If the problem persists, move the weight out towards the end of the blade. Try running the fan again. If the problem persists, keep moving the weight. If you are near the … Read More