In-Ground Basketball Hoop – The Pros and Cons

General Article

In-ground basketball hoops can be seen in schools and parks the world over. Children and adults alike gather for a lively game of hoops, sometimes as often as every day in such places where all you have to bring is a ball and a drive to win.

With this type of equipment, there is no base to possibly get in the way of that slam dunk landing. Materials used to construct the poles are rigid and sturdy, as well as weather resistant, often times featuring a strong powder coat finish which is rust and scratch resistant. Backboards are available in a variety of sizes, from the standard 72 "down to 54" for the smaller space. Backboards are also available in an array of construction materials, from new technology Polycarbonate reflecting shatter proof properties, to the traditional tempered glass that is still used in professional settings. Materials such as steel, fiberglass and acrylic are also used in making backboards.

Many poles are adjustable, making it easy to play with kids of all ages. Finding a unit with a range of up to 4 feet helps to offer something for everyone. Some come in pieces, and others are single unit, solid style. Solid poles will be more sturdy and hold up incredibly against all the beatings the backboard will take. Flex hoops with springs also help to pillow the impact from the ball and hands that may hang on after a dunk.

Once installed, an in-ground hoop is ready to go for several seasons of use! It just may take a few days to get it completely ready. The first step in setting up an in-ground hoop is to be sure of the location you wish to place it in. Once in, it will be there for good. For this reason, you want to be absolutely sure the location is exactly what you want and what will work best for your space and lifestyle.

When you have chosen the location for your hoop and you have the necessary concrete from your local home improvement store, you will cut a hole into your existing concrete that is 24 "diameter by 36" deep. Then you will place the plate and J-bolts into the hole and pour cement into the hole. You will want at least 15 "of the pole to be buried in concrete, so it may help to mark the pole 15" from the bottom. Using a leveler will help you to know your pole is inserted properly, straight up and down. If your pole is in pieces, you will need to wait 72 hours before attaching the remaining pieces of the pole to the piece that is inserted into the concrete.

Aside from a bit more prep work, an in-ground unit offers many of the same options as do other hoops. With the benefit of longevity and sturdiness, it can be the hoop enthusiasts greatest procurement for their home court!