Boston, Massachusetts – State House Golden Dome

General Article

Boston, Massachusetts - State House Golden Dome

From mass.gov :-

For generations, Bostonians have used the dome of the State House to find their way to Beacon Hill, to symbolize their city, and to mark the center of the "Hub of the Solar System." But the shining landmark we love today hasn’t always gleamed with gold. In fact, it started out as a leaky wooden roof.
When up-and-coming Boston architect Charles Bulfinch took on the job of planning the State House, it was his first paid commission. He based his design on neoclassical elements: columns, a pediment, and a vast shingled dome intended to make the structure stand out among its squat, square neighbors. When construction was finished in 1798, the State House was the most architecturally important public building in the young country, the first answer to the question of what an American government building should look like. Boston’s grandest building, perched atop its highest hill, became an instant monument.

Unfortunately, Bulfinch’s grand achievement couldn’t quite stand up to New England weather. The impressive 30-foot-high dome began to leak almost immediately. After just 4 years, enough rain and snow had seeped in that the wooden shingles were beginning to rot here and there. A hero of the Revolution was called in to save the day. Paul Revere’s foundry was hired to make the dome watertight by sheathing it with a thick layer of copper (thus creating what may be the world’s largest piece of Revereware).

The new copper top was painted the dark grey of lead at first. Soon after — although no one is sure exactly when — the dome became "golden" for the first time. Boston guidebooks from the 1820s refer to the dome as yellow or bronze; we know those accounts are accurate, because during the most recent State House renovation, contractors who peeled away old paint on the dome discovered multiple coats of pale yellow paint. In 1831, though, the dome returned to its earlier leaden grey, and it remained that color for more than 40 years.

The person most responsible for the State House dome as we know it today is Nathaniel P. Banks, Governor of Massachusetts from 1858 to 1861. Banks dreamed of making the State House a magnificent landmark, something befitting the old description of Boston as "a shining city on a hill." He spoke about it often during his term as governor — persuasively, as it turned out, although the Civil War intervened. In 1874, the dome was gilded for the first time with 23.5 karat gold leaf.

In the nearly 130 years since then, the State House’s golden dome has dimmed only once: during World War II, when it was painted a dull grey to hide the glimmer of gold from any enemy ships in Boston Harbor that might have wanted to use it to aim their weapons. It was regilded in 1947 and has been the jewel of Boston’s skyline ever since.

How Do They Do That?
To keep its characteristic brilliance, the State House dome … Read More

Empire State – New York City

General Article

Empire State -  New York City

The Empire State Building is a 102-story skyscraper located in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, on Fifth Avenue between West 33rd and 34th Streets. It has a roof height of 1,250 feet (380 m), and with its antenna spire included, it stands a total of 1,454 feet (443 m) high. Its name is derived from the nickname for New York, the Empire State. It stood as the world’s tallest building for nearly 40 years, from its completion in early 1931 until the topping out of the original World Trade Center’s North Tower in late 1970. Following the September 11 attacks in 2001, the Empire State Building was again the tallest building in New York (although it was no longer the tallest in the US or the world), until One World Trade Center reached a greater height on April 30, 2012. The Empire State Building is currently the fourth-tallest completed skyscraper in the United States (after the One World Trade Center, the Willis Tower and Trump International Hotel and Tower, both in Chicago), and the 25th-tallest in the world (the tallest now is Burj Khalifa, located in Dubai). It is also the fifth-tallest freestanding structure in the Americas.

The Empire State Building is generally thought of as an American cultural icon. It is designed in the distinctive Art Deco style and has been named as one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World by the American Society of Civil Engineers. The building and its street floor interior are designated landmarks of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, and confirmed by the New York City Board of Estimate. It was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1986. In 2007, it was ranked number one on the AIA’s List of America’s Favorite Architecture.

The building is owned by the Empire State Realty Trust, of which Anthony Malkin serves as Chairman, CEO and President.[17] In 2010, the Empire State Building underwent a $550 million renovation, with $120 million spent to transform the building into a more energy efficient and eco-friendly structure.[18] The Empire State Building is the tallest Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified building in the United States, having received a gold LEED rating in September 2011.

History
The site of the Empire State Building was first developed as the John Thompson Farm in the late 18th century. At the time, a stream ran across the site, emptying into Sunfish Pond, located a block away. Beginning in the late 19th century, the block was occupied by the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, frequented by The Four Hundred, the social elite of New York.

The limestone for the Empire State Building came from the Empire Mill in Sanders, Indiana which is an unincorporated town adjacent to Bloomington, Indiana. The Empire Mill Land office is near State Road 37 and Old State Road 37 just south of Bloomington. Bloomington, Bedford and Oolitic area are known locally as the limestone capital of the world

Design and construction:
The Empire State Building was designed by William … Read More

Central Hardware

General Article

Central Hardware

Central Hardware was once a midwestern hardware store chain based in St. Louis, Missouri. Central was one of the first home improvement store chains to regularly build stores topping 50,000 square feet. This store in Columbus was built in 1979. In the late 1980s and 1990s, other chains like Hechinger and Builders Square with larger stores moved into the area. The Central Hardware chain went bankrupt in 1995 and shut down all their stores. Central once had stores in many markets. Some of these markets include Columbus, St. Louis, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, and Memphis.

I really can’t find much about this chain but here are some former locations I tracked down.

Ohio
>Northland Boulevard and Southland Road (Central Park Plaza), Forest Park
Might be empty, not sure if buffet is still there
>Montgomery Road and Sherman Avenue (Surrey Square Mall), Norwood
Surrey Square was an actual enclosed mall anchored by just Central and a Thriftway Supermarket! It has been demolished since the mid-2000s.
>Beechmont Avenue and I-275 (Beechmont Plaza), Cincinnati
Demolished for Home Depot
>Refugee and Hamilton Roads (the location this picture is of), Columbus
>Cleveland Avenue and I-270 (Westworth Station), Columbus
Looks like it might be empty now
>Olentangy River Road and Bethel Road (Olentangy Plaza), Columbus
Now a Micro Center store

Tennessee
>Elvis Presley Boulevard and Seife Road, Memphis
Abandoned still, originally a Corondolet store
>Perkins Road and American Way, Memphis
Now New Horizons Computer Learning Center

Indiana
>US 31 (south of Southport Road), Indianapolis

Illinois
>10705 Lincoln Trail, Fairview Heights
Turned into Value City department store, now Value City Furniture and Harbor Freight Tools
>3000 Homer Adams Parkway, Alton
Now Atlantis Pools

Missouri
>Interstate 270 and Halls Ferry Road, Ferguson
Demolished for Shop ‘n Save
>Mid-Rivers Center, St. Peters
Now Value City Furniture
>4445 Lemay Ferry Road, St. Louis
Now Babies R Us and Sports Authority
>15355 Manchester Rd, Ballwin
Now Jo-Ann Fabrics and Buy Buy Baby
>10720 Big Bend Road, Kirkwood
long demolished
>Olive and Mason Roads, Creve Coeur
Now Commerce Mortgage
>1212 S. Gannon Drive, Festus
Now Hood’s Discount Home Center
>1616 Dielman Road, Overland
B&J Peerless Restaurant Supply
>5835 Manchester Avenue, Saint Louis
Now CK Supply

If you wish to use this photo please contact me (Nicholas Eckhart) in one of the following ways:
>Send a FlickrMail message
>Comment on the photo(s)
>Send an email to [email protected]

Posted by Nicholas Eckhart on 2015-05-07 23:02:32

Tagged: , Columbus , Ohio , OH , America , US , USA , 2015 , Retail , Stores … Read More

Empire State – NY – Aerial View

General Article

Empire State - NY - Aerial View

The Empire State Building is a 102-story skyscraper located in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, on Fifth Avenue between West 33rd and 34th Streets. It has a roof height of 1,250 feet (380 m), and with its antenna spire included, it stands a total of 1,454 feet (443 m) high. Its name is derived from the nickname for New York, the Empire State. It stood as the world’s tallest building for nearly 40 years, from its completion in early 1931 until the topping out of the original World Trade Center’s North Tower in late 1970. Following the September 11 attacks in 2001, the Empire State Building was again the tallest building in New York (although it was no longer the tallest in the US or the world), until One World Trade Center reached a greater height on April 30, 2012. The Empire State Building is currently the fourth-tallest completed skyscraper in the United States (after the One World Trade Center, the Willis Tower and Trump International Hotel and Tower, both in Chicago), and the 25th-tallest in the world (the tallest now is Burj Khalifa, located in Dubai). It is also the fifth-tallest freestanding structure in the Americas.

The Empire State Building is generally thought of as an American cultural icon. It is designed in the distinctive Art Deco style and has been named as one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World by the American Society of Civil Engineers. The building and its street floor interior are designated landmarks of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, and confirmed by the New York City Board of Estimate. It was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1986. In 2007, it was ranked number one on the AIA’s List of America’s Favorite Architecture.

The building is owned by the Empire State Realty Trust, of which Anthony Malkin serves as Chairman, CEO and President.[17] In 2010, the Empire State Building underwent a $550 million renovation, with $120 million spent to transform the building into a more energy efficient and eco-friendly structure.[18] The Empire State Building is the tallest Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified building in the United States, having received a gold LEED rating in September 2011.

History
The site of the Empire State Building was first developed as the John Thompson Farm in the late 18th century. At the time, a stream ran across the site, emptying into Sunfish Pond, located a block away. Beginning in the late 19th century, the block was occupied by the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, frequented by The Four Hundred, the social elite of New York.

The limestone for the Empire State Building came from the Empire Mill in Sanders, Indiana which is an unincorporated town adjacent to Bloomington, Indiana. The Empire Mill Land office is near State Road 37 and Old State Road 37 just south of Bloomington. Bloomington, Bedford and Oolitic area are known locally as the limestone capital of the world

Design and construction:
The Empire State Building was designed by William … Read More

Schenectady New York ~ Nott Memorial Corridor ~ Union Higher education ~ Historical

General Article

Schenectady  New York ~ Nott Memorial Hall ~ Union College ~ HIstorical

1st employed as a campus museum.
The Nott Memorial is an elaborate 16-sided stone-masonry making which serves as both of those architectural and physical centerpiece of Union Higher education in Schenectady, New York. Devoted to Eliphalet Nott, president of Union for a remarkable sixty-two years (1804–1866), the 110-foot (34 m) higher by 89-foot (27 m) huge composition is a Nationwide Historic Landmark.
Formally specified Nott Memorial Corridor but referred to by generations of pupils and college basically as “The Nott” or “The Nipple” (often “The Nipple of Information”), the building’s centrality and preliminary style trace back again to Josef Ramee’s 1813 conception of the faculty grounds, the initial planned faculty campus in the United States.

The Memorial was designed by Edward Tuckerman Potter, architect of place church buildings and homes, alumnus of the faculty, and grandson of President Nott. Construction started in 1858 and was done in 1879. The final result is a person of pretty number of 16-sided structures in the earth.

For almost a century the Nott was generally open within. In 1961 the faculty moved its bookstore into the basement and configured the initial two floors into theater in the round. The upper floors have been at some point shut off and fell into disrepair.
In 1993 the faculty started a finish renovation of the Nott, restoring it to its unique style. The award-successful undertaking was undertaken by famous Boston centered architecture agency Finegold Alexander + Associates Inc and carried out by A.J. Martini, Inc., contractors.[3] The bookstore and theater have been moved to other destinations on the campus, and in 1995 the Nott reopened on the celebration of Union’s two hundredth anniversary.

Posted by Onasill ~ Bill Badzo on 2016-06-21 21:fifty nine:fifteen

Tagged: , Schenectady , New , York , NY , Nott , Memorial , Corridor , Union , Higher education , Historical , NRHP , Register , Richardsonian , Romanesque , Design and style , Museum , LibraryUnionCollege , President , Landmark , US , Usa , The usa , UnitedStates , Bookstore , Restored , adaptive , reuse , Attraction , Journey , Faculty , Campus , Onasill … Read More