The Empire State Building

General Article

The Empire State Building

5th Avenue & 34th Street, NYC

by navema
www.navemastudios.com

The Empire State Building is a 102-story skyscraper located in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. It has a roof height of 1,250 feet (381 meters), and with its antenna spire included, it stands a total of 1,454 ft (443.2 m) high. Its name is derived from the nickname for New York, the Empire State. It stood as the world’s tallest building for 40 years, from its completion in 1931 until construction of the World Trade Center’s North Tower was completed in 1972. Following the September 11 attacks in 2001, the Empire State Building was again the tallest building in New York (although it was no longer the tallest in the US or the world). The Empire State Building was once again demoted to second-tallest building in New York on April 30, 2012, when the new One World Trade Center reached a greater height. The Empire State Building is currently the third-tallest completed skyscraper in the United States (after the Willis Tower and Trump International Hotel and Tower, both in Chicago), and the 22nd-tallest in the world (the tallest now is Burj Khalifa, located in Dubai). It is also the fourth-tallest freestanding structure in the Americas.

The site of the Empire State Building was first developed as the John Thompson Farm in the late 18th century. At the time, a stream ran across the site, emptying into Sunfish Pond, located a block away. Beginning in the late 19th century, the block was occupied by the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, frequented by The Four Hundred, the social elite of New York.
The limestone for the Empire State Building came from the Empire Mill in Sanders, Indiana which is an unincorporated town adjacent to Bloomington, Indiana. The Empire Mill Land office is near State Road 37 and Old State Road 37 just south of Bloomington. Bloomington, Bedford and Oolitic area are known as the limestone capital of the world. It is a point of local pride that the stone for the Empire State building came from there.

The Empire State Building was designed by William F. Lamb from the architectural firm Shreve, Lamb and Harmon, which produced the building drawings in just two weeks, using its earlier designs for the Reynolds Building in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and the Carew Tower in Cincinnati, Ohio (designed by the architectural firm W. W. Ahlschlager & Associates) as a basis. Every year the staff of the Empire State Building sends a Father’s Day card to the staff at the Reynolds Building in Winston-Salem to pay homage to its role as predecessor to the Empire State Building. The building was designed from the top down. The general contractors were The Starrett Brothers and Eken, and the project was financed primarily by John J. Raskob and Pierre S. du Pont. The construction company was chaired by Alfred E. Smith, a former Governor of New York and James Farley’s General Builders Supply Corporation … Read More

Empire State – New York City

General Article

Empire State -  New York City

The Empire State Building is a 102-story skyscraper located in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, on Fifth Avenue between West 33rd and 34th Streets. It has a roof height of 1,250 feet (380 m), and with its antenna spire included, it stands a total of 1,454 feet (443 m) high. Its name is derived from the nickname for New York, the Empire State. It stood as the world’s tallest building for nearly 40 years, from its completion in early 1931 until the topping out of the original World Trade Center’s North Tower in late 1970. Following the September 11 attacks in 2001, the Empire State Building was again the tallest building in New York (although it was no longer the tallest in the US or the world), until One World Trade Center reached a greater height on April 30, 2012. The Empire State Building is currently the fourth-tallest completed skyscraper in the United States (after the One World Trade Center, the Willis Tower and Trump International Hotel and Tower, both in Chicago), and the 25th-tallest in the world (the tallest now is Burj Khalifa, located in Dubai). It is also the fifth-tallest freestanding structure in the Americas.

The Empire State Building is generally thought of as an American cultural icon. It is designed in the distinctive Art Deco style and has been named as one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World by the American Society of Civil Engineers. The building and its street floor interior are designated landmarks of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, and confirmed by the New York City Board of Estimate. It was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1986. In 2007, it was ranked number one on the AIA’s List of America’s Favorite Architecture.

The building is owned by the Empire State Realty Trust, of which Anthony Malkin serves as Chairman, CEO and President.[17] In 2010, the Empire State Building underwent a $550 million renovation, with $120 million spent to transform the building into a more energy efficient and eco-friendly structure.[18] The Empire State Building is the tallest Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified building in the United States, having received a gold LEED rating in September 2011.

History
The site of the Empire State Building was first developed as the John Thompson Farm in the late 18th century. At the time, a stream ran across the site, emptying into Sunfish Pond, located a block away. Beginning in the late 19th century, the block was occupied by the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, frequented by The Four Hundred, the social elite of New York.

The limestone for the Empire State Building came from the Empire Mill in Sanders, Indiana which is an unincorporated town adjacent to Bloomington, Indiana. The Empire Mill Land office is near State Road 37 and Old State Road 37 just south of Bloomington. Bloomington, Bedford and Oolitic area are known locally as the limestone capital of the world

Design and construction:
The Empire State Building was designed by William … Read More

Block Court Arcade Moderne, Harry Norris design 1930, in 1985

General Article

Block Court Arcade Moderne, Harry Norris design 1930, in 1985

Melbourne Central Activities District (CAD) Conservation Study 1985 survey images: approx 1200 Kodak colour negatives:
Melbourne Central Activities District (CAD) Conservation Study 1985 on the main building and this arcade:

`Built as the Athenaeum Club Building (plus ground level shops), it was built in the name of club secretary James H Moorhead, to the design of William Salway and on land leased from W J Lobb. The contractor was J Gillespie of Fitzroy. Occupiers listed in the 1890s directories are limited to the Club (288) and appropriate shop holders, such as tobacconists of hairdressers, filling the 292 Collins Street address. Among them were George Roberts and Montague Levy and, in the late 1890s, the chemist, George Swift, moved from Swanston Street to provide a second retailer at the club entrance. Swift was there into the 1920s, accompanied by Blight & Shannon’s tea rooms, which superseded the various hairdressing businesses at 290. After near 40 years of peaceful club life, John Lobb’s estate sold the building to the Hotham Estate Pty Ltd (1929), commencing a new, comparatively brash existence as leased offices over a ground floor zig-zag Moderne styled arcade. The club sought new premises further east in Collins Street and in its place Block Court housed mainly women’s clothing makers and retailers. Ye Old Dutch Tea & Coffee House was in the basement and the two main shops at the Collins Street arcade entry were Treasure Chest, lingerie, and the Block Bag Shoppe. In the arcade itself were the Nic Nac gift shop, Daddy Long Legs lingerie, Claire the Milliner (with workrooms upstairs), plus the generally French named dressmaking and lingerie firms who populated the four upper floors.
Harry A Norris designed the arcade renovation in 1930 as an annexe to the Block Arcade. Although not the only arcade to be either cut through an old building or built new in the 1930s (see Manchester Unity arcade), this arcade possesses the most integrity to its period and feeds from the distinct character of the adjacent block.’…

`The ground level has been totally refinished in 1930, and takes on this era, except for subsequent alterations. The arcade is finished with brass shopfront joinery, set over terrazzo plinths with ornate jazz moderne fibrous plasterwork in the ceiling. The floor is finished with a terrazzo with geometric border, again in the jazz moderne manner. Off the main Arcade is a minor lift lobby, with original lift door and architrave, with the sign `LIFT’painted in gold outline on a marble board over the head. Above that again is a Tenants’ Directory, again painted on white marble, with a number of faded names attached, as divided into First, Second and Third Floor columns. Adjacent to that is a Buchan marble dado and white marble stair, leading up to the office floors. A faded sign here reads, `LOITERERS AND HAWKERS NOT ALLOWED.’

The Arcade is an impressive example of 1930 French inspired ornamentation, with all aspects generally intact. This extends to a pair of brass framed … Read More

Home Remodel

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Home Remodel

Remodel

Posted by Todd & Barbara on 2008-02-02 20:37:33

Tagged: , friends , remodel , architecture , building , residential building , architectural , structures , edifice , edifices , USA , CA , Davis , us … Read More

Home Remodel

General Article

Home Remodel

Remodel

Posted by Todd & Barbara on 2008-02-02 20:50:07

Tagged: , friends , remodel , architecture , building , residential building , architectural , structures , edifice , edifices , USA , CA , Davis , us … Read More