looking N at entrance to dining room – Tinsley Living Farm – Museum of the Rockies – 2013-07-08

General Article

looking N at entrance to dining room - Tinsley Living Farm - Museum of the Rockies - 2013-07-08

Looking north at the entrance to the dining room on the first floor of the house on the grounds of the Tinsley Living Farm at the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Montana. Few houses had a dining room, unless they had large families. Note the chairs, as people would need to sit close to the stove in winter.

The house was constructed in 1889 by William and Lucy (Nave) Tinsley. William Tinsley worked for Wells Fargo and migrated to Montana in 1864. Lucy was a dressmaker who emigrated to Virginia City, Montana, the same year. Both were originally from Missouri. They met in Virginia City, married in 1867, and relocated to Willow Creek in the Gallatin Valley (about 40 miles west of Bozeman). They built a homestead log cabin (about the size of the current blacksmith shop), and lived there until 1889. Their first child was born in 1868, and by 1889 they had eight kids.

William Tinsley built the family a two-story home out of logs taken from the nearby Tobacco Root Mountains. The oldest children helped haul the logs, which took two days to get to the homestead. The structure took two years to construct. Most of the items in the house were ordered from the Sears catalog. The family occupied the house until the 1920s.

The house was purchased by the museum in 1987, and moved from its original location to the Museum of the Rockies in 1989. Refurbished with items donated by Tinsley descendants, it now serves as a living history museum. The house sits on 10 acres of land, and includes a historically accurate kitchen garden, flower garden, chicken coop, farm implements, carriage house, blacksmith shop, root cellar, outhouse, functioning well and pump, storage shed, and fields. A full cellar was excavated beneath Tinsley House as well.

Visitors are free to touch and use many of the items in Tinsley House. A staff of historical re-enactors includes four women who cook, clean, sew, and perform chores around the house as well as a blacksmith who does ironmongery and repairs.

Posted by Tim Evanson on 2013-07-23 02:17:04

Tagged: , Tinsley Living Farm … Read More

looking S from entry hall into dining room – Tinsley Living Farm – Museum of the Rockies – 2013-07-08

General Article

looking S from entry hall into dining room - Tinsley Living Farm - Museum of the Rockies - 2013-07-08

Looking S from the entrance hall into the dining room on the first floor of the house on the grounds of the Tinsley Living Farm at the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Montana. Note how spare this room is compared to any other.

The house was constructed in 1889 by William and Lucy (Nave) Tinsley. William Tinsley worked for Wells Fargo and migrated to Montana in 1864. Lucy was a dressmaker who emigrated to Virginia City, Montana, the same year. Both were originally from Missouri. They met in Virginia City, married in 1867, and relocated to Willow Creek in the Gallatin Valley (about 40 miles west of Bozeman). They built a homestead log cabin (about the size of the current blacksmith shop), and lived there until 1889. Their first child was born in 1868, and by 1889 they had eight kids.

William Tinsley built the family a two-story home out of logs taken from the nearby Tobacco Root Mountains. The oldest children helped haul the logs, which took two days to get to the homestead. The structure took two years to construct. Most of the items in the house were ordered from the Sears catalog. The family occupied the house until the 1920s.

The house was purchased by the museum in 1987, and moved from its original location to the Museum of the Rockies in 1989. Refurbished with items donated by Tinsley descendants, it now serves as a living history museum. The house sits on 10 acres of land, and includes a historically accurate kitchen garden, flower garden, chicken coop, farm implements, carriage house, blacksmith shop, root cellar, outhouse, functioning well and pump, storage shed, and fields. A full cellar was excavated beneath Tinsley House as well.

Visitors are free to touch and use many of the items in Tinsley House. A staff of historical re-enactors includes four women who cook, clean, sew, and perform chores around the house as well as a blacksmith who does ironmongery and repairs.

Posted by Tim Evanson on 2013-07-23 02:17:01

Tagged: , Tinsley Living Farm … Read More

looking SW from entry hall into dining room – Tinsley Living Farm – Museum of the Rockies – 2013-07-08

General Article

looking SW from entry hall into dining room - Tinsley Living Farm - Museum of the Rockies - 2013-07-08

Looking from the entrance hall into the dining room on the first floor of the house on the grounds of the Tinsley Lliving Farm at the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Montana.

The house was constructed in 1889 by William and Lucy (Nave) Tinsley. William Tinsley worked for Wells Fargo and migrated to Montana in 1864. Lucy was a dressmaker who emigrated to Virginia City, Montana, the same year. Both were originally from Missouri. They met in Virginia City, married in 1867, and relocated to Willow Creek in the Gallatin Valley (about 40 miles west of Bozeman). They built a homestead log cabin (about the size of the current blacksmith shop), and lived there until 1889. Their first child was born in 1868, and by 1889 they had eight kids.

William Tinsley built the family a two-story home out of logs taken from the nearby Tobacco Root Mountains. The oldest children helped haul the logs, which took two days to get to the homestead. The structure took two years to construct. Most of the items in the house were ordered from the Sears catalog. The family occupied the house until the 1920s.

The house was purchased by the museum in 1987, and moved from its original location to the Museum of the Rockies in 1989. Refurbished with items donated by Tinsley descendants, it now serves as a living history museum. The house sits on 10 acres of land, and includes a historically accurate kitchen garden, flower garden, chicken coop, farm implements, carriage house, blacksmith shop, root cellar, outhouse, functioning well and pump, storage shed, and fields. A full cellar was excavated beneath Tinsley House as well.

Visitors are free to touch and use many of the items in Tinsley House. A staff of historical re-enactors includes four women who cook, clean, sew, and perform chores around the house as well as a blacksmith who does ironmongery and repairs.

Posted by Tim Evanson on 2013-07-23 02:17:01

Tagged: , Tinsley Living Farm … Read More

wanting NE from entry hall at parlour – Tinsley Dwelling Farm – Museum of the Rockies – 2013-07-08

General Article

looking NE from entry hall at parlour - Tinsley Living Farm - Museum of the Rockies - 2013-07-08

Seeking northeast from the entry hall into the parlor on the first flooring of the house on the grounds of the Tinsley Lliving Farm at the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Montana.

The house was made in 1889 by William and Lucy (Nave) Tinsley. William Tinsley labored for Wells Fargo and migrated to Montana in 1864. Lucy was a dressmaker who emigrated to Virginia Town, Montana, the same yr. Each were being originally from Missouri. They met in Virginia Town, married in 1867, and relocated to Willow Creek in the Gallatin Valley (about forty miles west of Bozeman). They constructed a homestead log cabin (about the measurement of the present blacksmith shop), and lived there until eventually 1889. Their first child was born in 1868, and by 1889 they had eight young ones.

William Tinsley constructed the family a two-story home out of logs taken from the nearby Tobacco Root Mountains. The oldest youngsters served haul the logs, which took two days to get to the homestead. The composition took two many years to build. Most of the things in the house were being requested from the Sears catalog. The family occupied the house until eventually the 1920s.

The house was obtained by the museum in 1987, and moved from its initial place to the Museum of the Rockies in 1989. Refurbished with things donated by Tinsley descendants, it now serves as a dwelling background museum. The house sits on ten acres of land, and incorporates a traditionally precise kitchen garden, flower garden, chicken coop, farm implements, carriage house, blacksmith shop, root cellar, outhouse, operating nicely and pump, storage lose, and fields. A whole cellar was excavated beneath Tinsley Home as nicely.

Readers are no cost to contact and use lots of of the things in Tinsley Home. A personnel of historical re-enactors incorporates 4 girls who prepare dinner, clean, sew, and complete chores all-around the house as nicely as a blacksmith who does ironmongery and repairs.

Posted by Tim Evanson on 2013-07-23 02:16:fifty nine

Tagged: , Tinsley Dwelling Farm … Read More